e-Learning comments Singapore

Biopolis – Sustainable Urban Development 2011

The course material is very useful and well researched. I picked up valuable details and concepts of environmental protection. As a result, I am more knowledgeable and aware of programs mitigating climate change. Sharon Lee Siew Ng, Singapore

Thanks you for providing this opportunity to learn online. The materials covered are useful and relevant. I want to commend your organization for its good work on advancing the vital role of sustainable urban development and working towards environmentally sustainable cities; and sustainable waste management, turning waste into a resource. I gained a better understanding of sustainable urban development in relation to a small nation like Singapore without any natural resources. In order to fully understand the concept of sustainability, we need to understand all aspects of it: environmental, economic and social sustainability. It will be useful to have a topic dedicated on Liveable Cities. What makes a city liveable? Beyond affordable and quality housing. Gracious and Harmonious Living Environments. Develop a balanced assessment of urban liveability based on five key areas: Good Governance, Environmental Friendliness and Sustainability, Urban Infrastructure, Quality of Life, Economic Competitiveness and Vibrancy. Another suggestion is to focus a section on challenges that cities face: nexus of energy, water and food security. Policy makers, practitioners and researchers alike will gain insight into the nature of such challenges as well as the opportunities that lie within. Many thanks. Kwang Boon Lee, Vice President, United Nations Association of Singapore

Food, Agriculture and the Environment 2011-2013

Thanks for providing this opportunity to learn online. The materials covered are useful. I have a better understanding of the concept of sustainability as it applies to agriculture. In order to fully understand the concept of sustainability we need to understand all aspects of it: environmental, economic and social sustainability. Sustainable agriculture cannot be considered only as a form of agriculture to be recommended to farmers and encouraged with all the possible incentives. Sustainable agriculture is something more: a keystone for a sustainable society. It also puts people at the center of the farming system to increase resilience, income, and food security. I want to commend your organization for its good work on advancing the vital role of agriculture for rural development. Food Security is an important strategic objective. The materials clearly set out the challenge which is essential for the realization of the Millennium Development Goals. This is certainly true for Millennium Development Goal 1: the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger. It would be a good suggestion that the materials could also focus on one of the most vital concerns for food security in our world: the equality and integration of men and women throughout the agriculture sector. Studies show that when women are provided with equal resources, they can produce yields equal to those of men, if not more. But because there is a gender gap in access to resources like seeds, fertilizer, technology, and so much more, bringing women up to the same level of resources as men provides an important opportunity to improve overall productivity. Research also indicates that women are more likely than men to use their incomes to improve the well being of their families and communities. This is especially the case for children, as greater investments in education, health and nutrition for them will have long-lasting value. Many thanks. Kwang Boon Lee, Vice President, UNA of Singapore

After completing the topics of the course material, I believe that they should be brought to the attention of every individual in order to create awareness of our nature and the environment. Diverse topics have been covered in such a simple and interesting manner. I am really glad to read and understand the topics and would surely advise people to learn about nature, agriculture, food and environment. Undoubtedly, I would consider biotechnology as the most valuable topic. I cannot incorporate this technology in my day-to-day work, as I am in an entirely different field, however I will surely try to raise awareness among people. Ankit Anubhav, Senior Analyst, Dell, Singapore

Green Salary 2010-2011

From this course on Green Salaries, I have gained knowledge and understanding that we should not make a contradiction between growth and the need to protect the environment. Economic growth has to be “inclusive” so that it benefits all sectors of the population. For this to happen, change must come across the board, including to the way people live, the way they organize socially and the way politics are conducted. All the topics are relevant and interesting. Urbanization is defining the trend of the 21st century. Green growth is not only about combating climate change. Green growth is also a question of energy independence and therefore energy security – in other words, national security. Green growth is also good economics. Each of us needs to do our part to create a tremendous positive impact on our lives and the life of the planet. Many thanks. Kwang Boon Lee, Vice President, United Nations Association οf Singapore

The course material is very useful and well researched. I picked up valuable details and concepts of environment protection. As a result, I am more knowledgeable and aware of the programs in mitigating climate change. Sharon Lee Siew, Ng, Singapore

Sustainable Forest Protection and Management 2011-2013

Thank you for providing this opportunity to learn online. The materials are useful and relevant. We must acknowledge the enormous, irreplaceable contribution that the world’s forests make to the survival of biodiversity and human society. From international policy changes to school and community projects, the year 2011 has seen an unprecedented level of attention placed on forests, and the challenges facing them. A suggestion is to have a topic dedicated to identifying practical actions linking climate change and biodiversity objectives through forest and landscape restoration, using the REDD+ mechanism as a vehicle. I am also keen to learn more on the history of forest management, especially in Asia. For instance, in Bhutan, government policy protects 60% of land under forestry cover and it is essential to manage the challenge of timber as a building material and to search for alternatives, such as bamboo. There is also a move towards a more decentralised and people-centred approach to forestry. Many thanks. Kwang Boon Lee, Vice President, United Nations Association of Singapore, Singapore